Mahonia trifoliolata, Agarita, Currant-of-Texas, Wild Currant, Chaparral Berry, Agrito, Algerita

Agarita

Mahonia trifoliolata

Common Names: Currant-of-Texas, Wild Currant, Chaparral Berry, Agrito, Algerita

Light: Full Sun/Part Shade

Height: 3′ – 6′

Spacing/Spread: 3′ – 6′

Evergreen: Yes.

Color: Yellow flowers, Red fruit .

Interest: Spring Flowers, Year around evergreen foliage.

Landscape Companions: Texas sage, Century Plant, Red Yucca, Cherry Sage.

Texas Native: Yes, plant is Texas native.

Extra: WARNING, THORNY FOLIAGE. Deer Resistant.

Wildlife habitat: Provides food/shelter for bees, butterflies and birds.

Features: A very hardy and deer resistant Texas native shrub. Xeriscape plant.

Austin Native Landscaping: “Agarita is a tough sell; It’s thorny and scraggly. But its many positive characteristics are well worth considering: It’s an evergreen, will thrive both in full sun and part shade, has profuse yellow flowers in early spring following by edible red berries, very deer resistance, and off course extremely drought tolerant. It is quite prickly so do make sure to design this Texas native shrub away from pedestrian ways and any place where folks can stumble upon it. Highly recommended in any heavy deer pressure, Xeriscape landscape designs.

Fun fact: How to collect those delicious, thorn protected berries? Hand gathering will surly end up a tearful and frustrating experience. Put a bag or a small tarp underneath the plant and give it a few good whacks with a stick. The ripest of berries will fall and all that left for you is to devour those wild candies. Agarita berries are an excellent jelly ingredient as well.”

 

Plantaholic:

Family: Berberidaceae (Pronounced – bear-ber-id-AY-see-ee)

Genus: Mahonia (Pronounced – ma-HO-nee-uh)

Species: trifoliolata (Pronounced – try-foh-lee-oh-LAY-tuh)

Propagation: Seeds, Softwood cuttings, Hardwood cuttings.

History:

 

Currently Available:

 

 

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